Services

APPOINTMENT
Skyview Spa

Did you know that Skyview offers Spa days? That’s right a day where your pet can be pampered and leave smelling great with the scent of your choice and a bandana. When dropping your fur baby off you will be able to choose from a list of Shampoos, Conditioners, and Cologne that appeals to you. Listed below are your options that you can choose from.

Shampoos:
Fresh N’ Clean -deodorizer
Avenalyt – Moisturizer
HyLyt-whitening
Blueberry Facial – Tearless and whitening

Conditioners:
Fresh N Clean
Aloe and Oatmeal
Blueberry Clove

Cologne:
Green Apple
Pina Colada
Fresh N Clean

We offer bathing Monday -Friday by appointment only. What is included in our Spa day package:

Bath
Toe Nail Trim / Nail file
Ear Cleaning
Teeth Brushing
Warm blow dry to keep your pet cozy after their bath
Brush out
Bandana

Medicated baths:

Does your pet have sensitive skin or Allergies? Not a problem, We offer a wide variety of shampoos and conditioners that can help alleviate certain symptoms. Some pets are very sensitive to certain ingredients that can actually make their skin more irritated and dry after a bath.

Medicated Shampoos can help with:

Itchy skin/ Dry skin
Redness or irritated skin
Bacterial or fungal infections

Senior Wellness Program

Is your cat or dog over 7 years old?

Pets over the age of 7 are more prone to certain diseases, many of which are preventable if caught early.

These include:

Dental Disease (#1 problem in older pets)
We see 8-10 cases per DAY
Tumors and Cancers
We see several cases every day
Arthritis
We see 2-3 cases per WEEK
Diabetes  (Dog and Cat)
We see 2-3 cases per WEEK
Kidney Disease
We see 2 to 3 cases per MONTH
Thyroid Imbalance
We see 1 to 2 cases per MONTH
Liver Disease
We see 1 case every other MONTH
Cognitive Disorder Dysfunction
We see 4 – 6 cases every YEAR
Heart Disease
We see 5-6 cases every MONTH
Incontinence
We see 1 case every MONTH

Early Detection = Better Outcome

Skyview Animal Clinic introduces our Senior @ Seven program.  In this program we perform a comprehensive senior wellness examination every 6 months.  We also run a complete blood work, urinalysis evaluation to detect any early onset of disease.  With these services we can detect problems earlier and save lives.

Wellness and Vaccination Programs

Puppy Wellness

Our puppy wellness program is designed to help get your puppy started on the right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months are a critical period in your puppy’s development, and we can give you the support and tools necessary to help him or her grow into a well-mannered, healthy dog, including information and advice on nutrition, training, behavior, and socialization.

Schedule your puppy for his or her first exam as soon as possible. Until your puppy has received a series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. We will make sure your new dog is protected against rabies, distemper, and parvovirus, among other diseases. Your puppy will also need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are extremely common in young dogs.

Most puppies have roundworms, which are intestinal worms that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal signs (although dogs can have worms without showing any symptoms). It is important for puppies to be treated for roundworms, not only to rid them of the infection but also to prevent you and the rest of your family from becoming infected. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasite, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your puppy is properly treated, you can keep your entire family safe from these and other parasites.

Kitten Wellness

Our kitten wellness program is designed to help get your kitten started on the right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months are a critical period in your kitten’s development, and we can give you the support and tools necessary to help him or her grow into a well-mannered, healthy cat, including information and advice on nutrition, litterbox training, and behavior.

Schedule your kitten for his or her first exam as soon as possible. Until your kitten has received a series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. We will make sure your new pet is protected against rabies and panleukopenia (distemper). Depending on your cat’s risk, we may also advise vaccinating him or her against other diseases, such as feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In addition, your kitten will need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are common in young cats.

Most kittens have roundworms, which are intestinal worms that can cause coughing, weight loss, and a potbellied appearance in cats (although they may not cause any symptoms). It is important for kittens to be treated for roundworms, not only to help rid them of the infection but also to prevent you and the rest of your family from becoming infected. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasite, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your kitten is properly treated, you can keep your entire family safe.

Dentistry
Imagine what your mouth would feel like if you never brushed your teeth or went to the dentist. For many dogs and cats, this is a painful reality. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, more than 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have dental disease by the age of 3. Dental (or periodontal) disease is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in pets.

Common signs of dental disease include:

Yellow or brown buildup (tartar) on the teeth
Red, swollen, or bleeding gums
Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Changes in eating or chewing habits
Pawing at the face
Loose teeth
Depression

Even if your dog or cat doesn’t have these symptoms, we recommend that you have a veterinarian evaluate your pet’s dental health at least once a year. Bacteria and food debris accumulate around the teeth and, if left unchecked, will lead to deterioration of the soft tissue and bone surrounding the teeth. This decay can result in irreversible periodontal disease, tooth loss, and possibly expensive oral surgery.

Dental disease can also affect other organs in the body: Bacteria in the mouth can get into the bloodstream and cause serious infections in the kidneys, liver, lungs, and heart. If these problems aren’t caught and treated quickly enough, they can result in death. A physical exam combined with appropriate laboratory work can determine if infection in the mouth has spread.

Schedule your pet’s dental exam today! We can also help show you how to brush your pet’s teeth and recommend foods and treats that will help combat plaque and tartar buildup.

Radiology
When we need to figure out what’s wrong with your pet, we routinely use x-rays to help identify the cause of the problem, rule out possible problems, or provide a list of possible causes. We may also use x-rays during a wellness exam to diagnose potential problems before they become serious.

X-rays provide valuable information about a pet’s bones, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, intestines, colon), respiratory tract (lungs), heart, and genitourinary system (bladder, prostate). We use radiology alone or in conjunction with other diagnostic tools. Interpretation of radiographs requires great skill on the part of the veterinarian.

We are proud to offer digital radiology (x-rays that are captured digitally rather than on film). This state-of-the-art technology allows us to provide you with a quicker diagnosis for your pet. Plus, it uses less radiation than traditional x-rays.

To avoid a blurry image, pets need to remain completely still while an x-ray is taken. In some cases, we may need to sedate your pet or use short-acting general anesthesia.

Flea Prevention
A flea problem on your pet means a flea problem in your home. Understanding the flea life cycle and methods for its control can be a daunting task. We will gladly assist you in this process. We can provide you with safe, effective flea prevention and if necessary, flea treatment. See more information on fleas by clicking here.

The egg stage

Adult fleas can begin feeding within seconds of finding a host. They must feed to begin reproduction, and female fleas will begin producing eggs within 24 to 48 hours of taking their first blood meal.2

Female fleas can produce 40 to 50 eggs per day, up to 2,000 in their lifetime.1 The eggs readily fall off the hair into the environment, so you can think of your pet as a flea-egg “salt shaker.” Wherever the pet spends the most time is usually where the heaviest flea infestations are found.

The larval stage

Larvae hatch from eggs in one to six days given appropriate environmental conditions (a relative humidity between 50 and 92 percent). Their principal food is adult flea feces (“flea dirt”).3

Flea larvae are small, thin and white, measuring 1 to 2 millimeters in length (about the thickness of a dime). Indoors, flea larvae tend to live deep in carpeting or under furniture. Outside, they develop best in shaded areas or under leaves or similar yard debris. Any area of a yard where a pet seeks shelter from the heat or cold is potentially a great environment for fleas.

The pupa stage

A mature larva transforms into a pupa inside a silk cocoon. Under most household conditions, the adult flea will emerge in three to five weeks. However, a fully developed flea can remain inside the cocoon for up to 350 days,4 a reproductive strategy that enhances the flea’s chance of survival. This helps to explain how a flea infestation can seemingly “explode” out of nowhere, even inside your home.

The adult stage

Adults emerging from cocoons can begin feeding immediately if a host is present. They are attracted by body heat, movement and exhaled carbon dioxide.2

The flea feeds through a tiny, slender mouth part called the proboscis. Before feeding, it pumps saliva, which contains an anticoagulant, onto the skin. This prevents the blood from clotting, and the protein it contains can cause a severe allergic reaction in the host (flea allergy dermatitis).

Adult fleas can survive throughout the winter on pets as well as on wildlife.

Dermatology
Skin problems are common in dogs and cats and can be caused by hormonal disorders, allergies, infections, or parasites such as fleas and mites. These issues can be particularly difficult to treat and should be addressed promptly.

We can often diagnose a skin problem by simply examining your pet. Some dermatologic diseases or conditions do require additional diagnostic procedures to ensure a correct diagnosis. Depending on your pet’s symptoms and the results of our physical exam, we may run blood work or perform a urinalysis, skin scraping, or biopsies.

The cause of skin problems range from hormonal disorders to the common flea. You should book an appointment for your pet if you notice any excessive itchy behavior, loss of hair, and/or the presence of scabs or scale on the skin.

Exotic Pet Care and Surgery

Sheep and Goats

Dr. Byrd has extensive experience working with sheep and goats. We have the facility to treat pet sheep and goats including castration under anesthesia, caesarian section surgery, and intestinal parasite control. We can also give expert advice on herd management.

Rabbits

One of the fastest growing small mammal pets are rabbits. It is important to know that they have unique dietary needs as compared to other rodents. We are skilled at the complete medicine and surgery of rabbits. Did you know that spaying your female rabbit is VITAL for prevention of uterine cancer, a common killer of adult female rabbits?

Rabbits are susceptible to a variety of diseases and conditions, including overgrown teeth, hairballs, parasites, and cancer. They also tend to hide signs of illness or pain.

Contact us if your rabbit:

Has discharge from the eyes or nose, runny stool, or a gurgling stomach
Has an elevated or low temperature
Begins drooling, scratching at the ears, or sneezing
Starts tilting his or her head
Develops bald patches in his or her fur
Stops eating, appears overly quiet or shows other abnormal behavior

In addition, your rabbit can benefit from regular dental checkups. We can help make sure problems with your rabbit’s teeth don’t turn into serious, potentially life-threatening conditions.

We also strongly suggest that you have your rabbit spayed or neutered. Not only can rabbits potentially give birth once a month, but they can also have up to 14 babies at a time! Even in households with a single rabbit, spaying or neutering has plenty of benefits: It can protect your rabbit from several types of cancer and reduce or eliminate aggression, as well as other undesirable behavior, such as spraying, mounting, destructive chewing, and biting. Spaying or neutering will not change your rabbit’s personality.

Reptiles

Reptiles are probably the most difficult pets to keep due to their unique environmental requirements. There are hundreds of different species that have begun to enter the houses of Cape Girardeau as pets. We pride ourselves on treating each individual species based on their specific needs.

Nutrition-related disorders and diseases are common in iguanas and other lizards. We can help you avoid these problems. Call us to set up a nutritional consultation so we can discuss how to help keep your lizard healthy.

We also offer an initial checkup for new lizard owners to help identify current or potential medical problems and, if necessary, begin treatment. In addition, we can provide you with information on appropriate enclosures, environmental requirements, sanitation, and disease prevention.

Ferrets

Skyview Animal Clinic has years of experience treating our ferret friends. Ferret dietary needs have evolved immensely from the days of just feeding them cat food. We recommend yearly examinations for every ferret along with yearly rabies and distemper vaccinations. We are also adept at performing a number of ferret procedures including insulinoma treatment, ferret adrenalectomy, tumor removals, and other common ailments.

You can help keep your ferret healthy by bringing him or her in for an exam once a year. That way, we can monitor any changes that occur in your pet and help prevent or catch diseases early, when they’re easier to treat. As ferrets age, they may need additional testing and dental care.

Common problems associated with ferrets include gastrointestinal disease, parasites, and cancer. In addition, ferrets are inquisitive creatures by nature and frequently ingest objects they shouldn’t. Regular blood tests can help determine whether your ferret has any problems with the kidneys, liver, or pancreas.

Ferrets can also benefit from receiving certain vaccinations and monthly preventives, which we’d be happy to discuss with you during your visit. Please bring a stool sample to your ferret’s annual exam so we can test for internal parasites.

Unless you are planning to breed your ferret, we recommend that he or she be spayed or neutered. Female ferrets, or jills, do not need to give birth once to stay healthy. In fact, spaying can save a ferret’s life. Jills that haven’t been spayed will stay in heat until they’re bred. This condition can cause anemia (a decrease in red blood cells), which can be fatal. In male ferrets, neutering can reduce their strong body odor, prevent marking, and reduce aggressive behavior.

Endocrinology
Identifying endocrine problems as early as possible is important in dogs and cats. These serious, potentially life-threatening conditions are much more manageable when caught early, allowing us to begin proper treatment.

The endocrine system is made up of a group of tissues (mostly glands) that release hormones into the bloodstream. These hormones regulate metabolism, growth, development, and reproduction and are dispersed to different areas of the body, depending on the hormone’s function. When a hormonal balance is disturbed (by a tumor or autoimmune disease, for instance), an endocrine disorder can develop. “Hyper” refers to an excess of hormone, and “hypo” refers to a deficiency in a hormone. Treatment varies depending on the disease.

There are several common endocrine disorders found in dogs and cats:

Diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency in or resistance to the hormone insulin.
Hypothyroidism, which is often diagnosed in dogs, indicates that the animal has low levels of thyroid hormone.

Hyperthyroidism, which frequently affects cats, indicates that the animal has high levels of thyroid hormones.

Addison’s disease (hypoadrenocorticism) and Cushing’s disease (hyperadrenocorticism) can also affect both species, although Cushing’s disease is rare in cats.

Contact us if your pet begins panting excessively, develops any skin issues (such as hair loss or dull coat), or shows any changes in behavior, energy levels, appetite, weight, water consumption, or urination.

Spay and Neuter

Spaying

Spaying your pet has many benefits. The procedure, which prevents female animals from becoming pregnant and reproducing, can help your dog or cat live a longer, healthier life. Spaying will not change your pet’s personality.

By spaying your female pet, you’re protecting her against potentially deadly diseases, including bacterial infections, reproductive tract diseases, and several types of cancer. You also won’t have to worry about her going into heat. This means avoiding the mess that often accompanies the heat cycle in female dogs and the pacing and crying that happens with female cats. In addition, spaying your pet will help control the dog and cat overpopulation problem, keeping more animals out of shelters.

Spaying, which involves removing the ovaries and uterus, is a surgical procedure and does need to be performed with the pet under anesthesia. We follow strict protocols and continually monitor your pet’s vital signs to help ensure her safety. Please see the descriptions under Anesthesia and Patient Monitoring for more information on what we do to keep your pet safe.

Neutering

Neutering your pet has many benefits. The procedure, which prevents male animals from reproducing, can help your dog or cat live a longer, healthier life. Neutering will not change your pet’s personality.

By neutering your pet, you’re reducing or eliminating his risk for prostate and testicular cancer, as well as sexually transmitted diseases. Neutering will also reduce or eliminate undesirable and embarrassing behavior, including roaming, fighting, humping, and spraying. In addition, neutering your pet will help control the dog and cat overpopulation problem, keeping more animals out of shelters.

Neutering, which involves removing the testicles, is a surgical procedure and does need to be performed with the pet under anesthesia. We follow strict protocols and continually monitor your pet’s vital signs to help ensure his safety. Please see the descriptions under Anesthesia and Patient Monitoring for more information on what we do to keep your pet safe.

Anesthesia and Patient Monitoring

Tranquilization/Sedation

If travel, thunder, or fireworks upset your pet, he or she may benefit from tranquilization or sedation. While sedated, the animal will stay awake or sleep lightly but can be roused when stimulated. To minimize any potential risk associated with tranquilization or sedation, we need to assess each animal individually before we dispense these medications.

Pain Management

We know the issue of pain management is of great concern to pet owners today. As in human medicine, we have a variety of medications available to manage your pet’s pain both before and after surgery and in the event of trauma. We would be pleased to discuss the options available to you and your pet under any of the above circumstances.

General Anesthesia

For some procedures, your pet will need to be administered general anesthesia so that he or she will be unconscious and not feel pain. Many pet owners worry about their pets being administered general anesthesia. We can assure you that modern anesthesia is generally quite safe; to further lower any risk, we perform a physical examination and run blood work ahead of time to catch any underlying health issues. In addition, we follow a specific anesthetic protocol, including monitoring vital signs during the procedure, to ensure the safety of our patients.

We begin most general anesthetic procedures by administering a sedative to help the pet relax and decrease any anxiety and pain. We then administer an intravenous drug to provide complete anesthesia and place a breathing tube into the patient’s trachea (windpipe). To maintain the state of unconsciousness, we deliver a gas anesthetic in combination with oxygen through the breathing tube.

Local Anesthesia

If your pet is having a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure performed, we sometimes use a local anesthetic to help control pain. For example, when we perform a biopsy (in which a small portion of tissue is surgically removed so it can be examined), we often use a local anesthetic. Local anesthetics cause a loss of sensation in the area where the procedure is being performed. We sometimes use a sedative and/or anxiolytic (anti-anxiety medication) in combination with the local anesthetic to keep pets calm during a procedure.

Microchipping

We use the HomeAgain microchip system in our patients.

This allows you to be notified if your pet is found by authorities at any time of the day.

If you have lost your pet and need to contact HomeAgain, click HERE or call 1-888-HOMEAGAIN (1-888-466-3242).

Imagine if your dog or cat got lost. You’d want to give him or her the best chance of getting home. With microchipping, you can.

Microchipping is a safe, permanent way to identify your pet in case he or she becomes lost. A microchip, which is a tiny device about the size and shape of a grain of rice, is placed just under the loose skin at the back of the neck. When a lost dog or cat without an ID tag is found, a veterinarian or veterinary technician will use a handheld microchip scanner to check for a chip. If the pet has one, it will transmit its ID number to the scanner via a low-frequency radio wave. The veterinary hospital or shelter then calls the chip manufacturer, retrieves the pet owner’s contact information, and calls the owner.

Even the most responsible pet owners can’t always guarantee their pet won’t get lost. A leash could break or slip out of your hand, a pet could push through a screen door or window, or a contractor or friend might accidentally leave a door or gate open.

We recommend that you use a microchip, along with a collar and ID tag, to identify your pet. An ID tag is still a reliable identification method. Pets that have tags with current contact information are more likely to not end up in shelters and tend to get home faster than those without tags. However, collars and ID tags aren’t permanent and can be removed (overnight or for grooming); pets can also lose them. With a microchip, your pet will have a much better chance of being identified and returned to you. Pets without microchips that end up in shelters may be adopted out to another family or even euthanized.

Please contact us to schedule an appointment to microchip your pet. Although we hope your pet never becomes lost, we want you to be prepared. We can also suggest a plan to have in place so if your pet does go missing, you’ll be able to act quickly.

Home Care

Your other family doctor at your doorstep!

Skyview is proud to offer at home veterinary service. Here is a list of the services offered at your home:

  • At home euthanasia
  • Annual exam/ vaccinations
  • Wellness examination
  • Sick pet evaluations
  • Animals treated:
    • Dogs
    • Cats
    • Exotic pets
    • Sheep/ Goats
    • Pot Bellied Pigs
    • Koi ponds
    • Fish
    • Reptiles
    • Birds

We’re devoted to your pet’s wellbeing.

Skyview Animal Clinic strives to offer excellence in veterinary care to Cape Girardeau, MO, and surrounding areas.

Location

2139 Megan Drive
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701
Click here for directions.

Hours

Monday: 7:30am – 5:30pm
Tuesday: 7:30am – 6:30pm
Wednesday: 7:30am – 5:30pm
Thursday: 7:30am – 5:30pm
Friday: 7:30am – 5:30pm
Saturday: 7:30am – 12:00pm
Sunday: Closed

Have a question?

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